Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park Quarter Design Finalized

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park Quarter Design Finalized

On August 13, 2019, the U.S. Mint announced the final design for the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park quarter at the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money in Rosemont, IL. Chosen was Donna Weaver’s design showing a young girl completing the planting of a Norway spruce seedling near an established tree. The reverse design is also inscribed with the words land stewardship.

The Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park quarter is the fourth release in 2020 and 54th in the series that honors a national park or historic site in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia and the 5 U.S. territories. The working farm and woodlands are located in Woodstock, VT.

Candidate Designs for new 2020 Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park Quarter

Candidate Designs for new 2020 Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park Quarter

In 2018, the U.S. Mint commissioned its artists to create candidate designs for the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock, VT. Eleven were reviewed for accuracy, edited, finalized, and then presented to the Citizen Coinage Advisory Committee and Commission of Fine Arts.

Two reverse designs featured a sugar maple sapling being planted by a pair of hands; one had the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller Mansion in the background, the other Vermont’s mountains.

A third design featured branches of a Norway spruce and a sugar maple with seeds, with the inscription people taking care of places.

A fourth design showed a sugar maple seedling passing from the hands of one generation to the next to symbolize stewardship and the sharing of natural resources.

A fifth depicted branches of a Norway spruce, with the symbolic release of seeds from the cones and the inscription legacy of conservation.

A sixth featured a Norway spruce seedling against a backdrop of horse-logged spruce and the inscription land stewardship.

A seventh showed Norway spruce saplings representing the reforestation of Mount Tom with the inscription future forest.

An eighth design depicted a carriage trail through a planted Norway spruce forest.

A ninth featured a young girl planting a Norway spruce seedling near an established tree to promote a sustainable forest for future enjoyment and education. It was inscribed with the words land stewardship.

A tenth design showed a young oak seedling next to a maple and a Norway spruce. Both were drawn to represent 150 years of environmental conservation and land stewardship throughout the park.

The final reverse design depicted a new-old method of horse logging, one of several different timbering methods used within the park.

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park featured in 54th National Park Quarter Series

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park featured in 54th National Park Quarter Series

Located in Woodstock, VT, the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park is devoted to land stewardship. Its mission originated with George Perkins Marsh born here in 1801. A young George witnessed the deforestation and erosion of Mount Tom located behind the family’s farm due to the era’s fast-moving lumber industry and a growing nation’s need for construction material. A more mature George, as state railroad commissioner, noted the dramatic decline of fish in rivers and lakes that he attributed to industrialization as well as deforestation. In 1864, the lawyer-turned diplomat, published his ground-breaking book Man and Nature, arguing that trees are nature’s stabilizing agents.

In 1869, Northern Pacific Railway tycoon Frederick Billings bought the 270-acre Marsh farm. Billings renovated the Federal-style brick mansion, adding numerous Victorian stylings. He also bought adjacent land, increasing his holdings to 1,000 acres, and planted enough corn to garner the status of the largest field in Vermont. Interested in land stewardship of all kinds, Billings established a scientifically managed herd of Jersey cows and operated a butter-making creamery. Using progressive forestry methods, he replanted Mount Tom and managed it as a woodland park while also harvesting timber by following a select method of logging. Billings further created a network of carriage roads and trails with scenic vistas on his property. When he died, his widow and then three daughters took over management of the sprawling enterprise.

In the early 1950s, a Billings granddaughter, Mary French Rockefeller, and her husband, Laurance S. Rockefeller, inherited the working farm and woodlands. In 1983 they opened the Billings Farm & Museum. Then in 1992, the couple donated the property that included 555 acres of Mount Tom forest, to the National Park Service. On June 5, 1998, the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park opened.

Learn more about the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park.

New 2020 Salt River Bay Quarter Released

Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve quarter

The new 2020 Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve quarter, the 53rd issue in the 2010-2021 National Park quarter series, has been released and is now in circulation.

This third new quarter design for 2020 features Salt River Bay, a federally protected are on St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands. A site of natural and historical significance, Salt River Bay preserves mangrove forests, upland watersheds and a delicate ecosystem that supports threatened and endangered species. The bay also contains archaeological and historical sites spanning over 2,000 years of human habitation in the Virgin Islands, including the only known site where members of a Christopher Columbus expedition set foot on what is now U.S. territory.

The reverse of the new quarter depicts a red mangrove tree in an early stage of maturation from a small plant to an adult tree. The design brings awareness to Salt River Bay’s endangered mangrove forests and their complex root structures in salt water. The 2020 Salt River Bay quarter can be paired with the 2009 U.S. Virgin Islands quarter.

Salt River Bay National Park Quarter design finalized

Salt River Bay quarter design

Salt River Bay quarter design

On August 13, 2019 at the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money in Rosemont, IL, the U.S. Mint unveiled the final design for the 2020 Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve quarter. Honoring a protected national site on St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the reverse design by Richard Masters of the U.S. Mint’s Artistic Infusion Program depicts a red mangrove tree in an early stage of maturation from a small plant to an adult tree. The design brings awareness to the bay’s endangered mangrove forests and the delicate nature of the species’ reproduction in salt water.

Inscriptions on the coin’s reverse include the name and location of the site, salt river bay and u.s. virgin islands; the year of issue, 2020; and the motto e pluribus unum.

This attractive issue in the National Park quarter series is a perfect match for the 2009 U.S. Virgin Islands territorial quarter, which features an outline of the islands and native flora and fauna. The 53rd issue in the 56-coin National Park series, the Salt River Bay quarter will be followed by the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve and Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site issues.