Candidate designs for new 2017 Ozark National Scenic Riverways Quarter

Candidate designs for the 2017 Ozark National Scenic Riverways quarter

Candidate designs for the 2017 Ozark National Scenic Riverways quarter

In late 2015, both the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee and the Commission of Fine Arts reviewed several candidate designs for the reverse of the 2017 Ozark National Scenic Riverways quarter.

The CCAC strongly preferred a design depicting a spiny softshell turtle poking its head above the water line to peek at a kayaker. The CFA opted for a coin showing Alley Mill – an 1890s steel roller mill once used for converting wheat into flour.

Located in Missouri, Ozark National Scenic Riverways holds a special claim to fame as America’s first-ever national park established to protect a river system. Today, visitors to Ozark are able to take advantage of many aquatic activities – like canoeing, boating, swimming and fishing – in the area’s crisp, spring-fed rivers.

Ozark National Scenic Riverways featured 38th in National Park Quarter series

Ozark National Scenic Riverways

Ozark National Scenic Riverways

Tucked away in south-central Missouri is a hidden gem – one of the lesser-known national parks, and the first set aside to protect a river system! Ozark National Scenic Riverways was created in 1964 to preserve the pristine waters of the Current and Jacks Fork Rivers.

In addition to the clear, spring-fed waters of Ozark, the park is home to over 300 caves. Just two – Round Spring Cave and Devils Well – are open to visitors. Another spot that’s popular with tourists is Alley Mill – an 1890s steel roller mill once used for converting wheat into flour.

Learn more about Ozark National Scenic Riverways.

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site quarter design finalized

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site Quarter Design

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site Quarter Design

In September 2016, the U.S. Mint revealed the final design for the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site quarter. As the second release for 2017, this beautiful quarter features the building known as Cedar Hill, the home of Frederick Douglass, and the famous abolitionist seated at a writing desk in the foreground.

Born into slavery, Douglass learned how to read and write. His education fueled his desire for freedom. Eventually he escaped and went North to freedom, spending his time speaking out against slavery. During the Civil War he recruited African Americans to fight for the Union and afterwards, he served as Minister to Haiti and U.S. Marshal to the District of Columbia.

Candidate designs for the new 2017 Frederick Douglass National Historic Site quarter

Candidate designs for the 2017 Frederick Douglass National Historic Site quarter

Candidate designs for the 2017 Frederick Douglass National Historic Site quarter

In October 2015, the Commission of Fine Arts and Citizens Advisory Committee met to review six designs for the reverse of the 2017 Frederick Douglass National Historic Site quarter. All designs varied: Two showed Douglass’ Cedar Hill home in the outskirts of Washington, D.C., one showed Douglass standing at a podium speaking, and one meeting with Abraham Lincoln. The last two depict him seated in a chair with his home, Cedar Hill, in the background – the main difference between the two is that one shows him seated at a writing desk.

After the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA), and the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) reviews designs, the U.S. Mint recommends the favorites to the Secretary of the Treasury who then makes the final selection.

The Frederick Douglass coin will honor this 8-acre national park, which offers a memorial garden, impressive views of the Capitol and an interesting tour of his home, now restored to the way it was when he lived there.

2nd National Park Quarter of 2017 features Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

Located atop Cedar Hill in southeast Washington, D.C., the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site overlooks the U.S. Capitol. The Victorian mansion, Cedar Hill, was once Frederick Douglass’ home. If you visit today, about 70% of the items found inside once belonged to Douglass himself. It was there that the famed abolitionist edited and published the newspaper Evening Star, held meetings and greeted distinguished guests.

Born into slavery, Douglass learned the alphabet at age 12 and in time, taught himself how to read and write. When he was 20 he escaped and took the name Frederick Douglass. He is known for his fiery speeches, his writings and his steadfast support of equal rights. The 37th coin in the National Park quarter series, and the 2nd issue of 2017, honors this interesting park that preserves Frederick Douglass’ legacy.

Learn more about Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.