Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) Quarter design finalized

Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter design

Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter design

On July 22, 2015, the U.S. Mint announced the final design for the Fort Moultrie, also known as Fort Sumter National Monument, quarters. The reverse shows a sergeant returning the regimental flag to the ramparts, as a British ship attacks in the distance.

The inscriptions on the coin’s reverse include the name of the site, fort moultrie; the location of the site, south carolina; the year of issue, 2016; and the motto, e pluribus unum.

This handsome quarter is a perfect match for the 2000 Statehood quarter, which also featured South Carolina, the park’s home state. As the 35th in the series overall, the Fort Moultrie quarter is the final issue for this year.

Candidate designs for new 2016 Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter

Fort Moultrie National Park quarter candidate designs

Candidate designs for the Fort Moultrie National Park quarter

In late 2014, both the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee and the Commission of Fine Arts reviewed several candidate designs for the reverse of the 2016 Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter.

CCAC discussed the potential of several designs before finally giving their recommendation to a design showing a sergeant returning the regimental flag to the ramparts, as a British ship attacks in the distance. The CFA gave its support to a closer view of a sergeant holding the flag, with cannon fire exploding behind him.

Located in South Carolina, Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) stands as a historic reminder of our nation’s past.

Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) featured 35th in National Park Quarter series

Fort Sumter National Monument

Fort Sumter National Monument

Fort Moultrie wasn’t yet complete in 1776, when British warships opened fire on Sullivan’s Island during the Revolutionary War. Even still, patriots stationed there were able to fend off the attack, and the fort was named for its commanding colonel, William Moultrie. Following the war’s end, the original fort fell in to disrepair. When war erupted between England and France in 1793, a second Fort Moultrie was built – which was eventually destroyed during an 1804 hurricane.

By the start of the Civil War, an improved fort (Sumter) had been built – and it was there that the war’s first battle was fought. Today, both forts are open to tourists. Moultrie has been restored to represent its historical time periods, while Sumter houses a museum.

Learn more about Fort Sumter National Monument.

Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter design finalized

Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter design

Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter design

In August of 2015, the U.S. Mint revealed the final design for Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter. As the fourth release for 2016, this beautiful quarter features Theodore Roosevelt on horseback near the Little Missouri River, which begins in Wyoming and runs through Theodore Roosevelt National Park. The park is located in southwestern North Dakota.

Divided into 3 separate areas, the South Unit, North Unit and Elkhorn Ranch Unit, this park is home to buffalo, wild horses, prairie dogs, elk and many other creatures. One of the more interesting ways visitors choose to explore the park is to take a 5-day canoe trip down the Little Missouri River. They begin at Medora near the South Unit and end at the Highway 85 bridge near the North Unit, 107 miles later. The Elkhorn Ranch Unit, the ranch Teddy Roosevelt considered his western “home,” is located between the South and North Units.

Candidate designs for 2016 Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter

Candidate designs for the 2016 Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter

Candidate designs for the 2016 Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter

In September 2014, both the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee and Commission of Fine Arts met separately to review six designs for the reverse of the 2016 Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter. All designs varied: Three showed a young Theodore Roosevelt looking at the landscape by the Little Missouri River, two showed his Maltese Cross Cabin, and the last showed 3 sandhill cranes flying above the Badlands and river, offering a birds-eye view the park’s North Unit.

The U.S. Mint recommends the groups’ favorites to the Secretary of the Treasury who then makes the final design selection. The Theodore Roosevelt National Park coin will honor this more than 70,000-acre national park. It offers visitors numerous hikes, camping, horseback riding and an opportunity to explore the extraordinary landscape where, in 1884, a young Teddy Roosevelt spent time recovering from the deaths of his mother and his young wife, who had both died the same the day.