2020 National Park of American Samoa quarter released

The new National Park of American Samoa quarter, 51st in the series and first of five to debut in 2020, is in circulation as of February 3rd.

U.S. Mint Artistic Infusion Program artist Richard Masters designed and Mint Medallic Artist Phebe Hemphill sculpted the National Park of American Samoa coin, which features a Samoan fruit bat mother hanging in a tree with her pup on the reverse. Masters’ design is intended to promote awareness to the species’ threatened status due to habitat loss and hunting. The obverse features the 1932 portrait of George Washington designed by John Flanagan.

The other 2020 quarters also honor America’s most popular national parks: Weir Farm National Historic Site in Wilton, CT; Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve in Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands; Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock, VT, and the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve based in Strong City, KS.

This detailed National Park of American Samoa quarter can be nicely paired with the 2009 Statehood quarter for American Samoa. Order today.

National Park of American Samoa Quarter design finalized

Final design for the American Samoa quarter

National Park of American Samoa quarter design

On August 13, 2019, the U.S. Mint announced the final design for the National Park of American Samoa quarter at the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money in Rosemont, IL.

U.S. Mint Artistic Infusion Program artist Richard Masters designed and Mint Medallic Artist Phebe Hemphill sculpted the National Park of American Samoa coin’s reverse. Masters’s design shows a Samoan fruit bat mother hanging in a tree with her pup. It is intended to promote awareness to the species’ threatened status due to habitat loss and hunting. Listed as a protected species, the Samoan fruit bat can have a wing span of up to three feet. It is sometimes called a flying fox, and flies during the day as well as at night.

The inscriptions on the coin’s reverse include the name and location of the site: American Samoa; the year of issue: 2020, and the motto: e pluribus unum.

The obverse features the 1932 portrait of George Washington designed by John Flanagan.

This detailed quarter pairs nicely with the 2009 Statehood quarter, which featured cultural artifacts and tropical foliage native to Samoa. At 51st in the series overall, the National Park of American Samoa quarter will be followed by a design honoring the Weir Farm National Historic Site in Wilton, CT.

National Park of American Samoa Quarter Candidate Designs

National Park of American Samoa Candidate Designs

Top two recommended National Park of American Samoa Quarter Candidate Designs

In 2018, the U.S. Mint commissioned its artists to create candidate designs for the 2020 National Park in American Samoa quarter. Ten were submitted for review by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee and the Commission of Fine Arts: three showed a Samoan man in native dress, blowing a conch shell; three showed fruit bats – a protected species also known as a flying fox – including one with a mother hanging from a tree with her pup; two showed reef fish with steep volcanic mountains in the background; one showed a flying fruit bat with a swimming sea turtle and a mountain in the background, and one showed a Threadfin Butterflyfish with a tattooed spiral wave.

See all the Candidate Designs for the National Park of American Samoa Quarter here.

National Park of American Samoa featured 51st in National Park Quarter Series

National Park of American Samoa

National Park of American Samoa

Located in the South Pacific Ocean – halfway between Hawaii and New Zealand – the National Park of American Samoa is the only U.S. park site located south of the Equator. The park has units on four steep volcanic islands covered by lush rainforests – Ta’ū, Ofu, Olosega and Tutuila, home to American Samoa’s capital city of Pago Pago and site of the National Park Service visitor center.

Established on October 31, 1988, the park has a lease agreement with participating villages that honors the Samoan culture of communal land ownership. The deeds of cession that the United States signed when making American Samoa a United States territory in 1900 and the American Samoan constitution provide the Samoan people a guarantee of this cultural tradition.

Each park unit has unique features. On Tutuila, the Pola Island hiking trail brings visitors to view the breathtaking Vai’ava Strait, a National Natural Landmark, on neighboring Pola Island.

Linked by a foot bridge, the islands of Ofu and Olosega are renowned for their unbleached coral reefs that are home to 250 coral reef species and 950 species of reef fish. The fine-grain, white sand beaches provide a recreational opportunity for outdoor walking.

With only three villages, Ta’ū provides visitors with opportunities to experience the traditional Samoan way of life that includes farming of breadfruit, banana, coconut and taro. Sea cliff stair steps allow hikers to climb Lata Mountain, the tallest in all of American Samoa at over 3,000 feet.

The fruit bat, also known as a flying fox, is a protected species. With a wingspan of up to three feet, it flies both at night and during the day, which means it can be seen roosting as well as flying throughout all four park units. This national park is also home to 35 different bird species.

Learn more about the National Park of American Samoa.

New 2019 Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Quarter released

The Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness quarter, the 50th issue of the National Park quarter series, is now in circulation. The official launch ceremony for this 5th and final 2019 issue took place on November 6, 2019 at Salmon Junior/Senior High School in Salmon, Idaho. Following the ceremony, a coin exchange was held and children received complimentary new quarters.

Salmon, Idaho is adjacent to the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness featured on the new coin. It’s the largest contiguous wilderness area in the lower 48 states and its name has two roots. The late Idaho senator Frank Church is credited with preserving this and many other wilderness areas throughout the country. And the Salmon River which runs through the wilderness became known as the “River of No Return” because its swift currents could be navigated downstream by non-motorized boats but not upstream. The reverse of the new quarter depicts a piloted drift boat in river rapids surrounded by conifer trees, rock formations and steep canyon slopes.

This latest National Park quarter joins four previous 2019 designs featuring Lowell National Historical Park in Massachusetts, War in the Pacific National Historical Park in Guam, American Memorial Park in the Northern Marianas Islands and San Antonio Missions National Historical Park in Texas.