2016 Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) Quarter released at the Fort

The new Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter, 35th issue of the series and the fifth design for 2016, is now in circulation. On November 17, 2016, the official launch ceremony for the new Fort Moultrie quarter took place in the park’s Visitor Center, which is located on Sullivan’s Island in South Carolina.
After the ceremony, a coin exchange was held where attendees were able to get $10 rolls of the new quarters at face value. This issue features a sergeant returning the regimental flag to the ramparts, as a British ship attacks in the distance. Add the new Fort Moultrie quarters to your collection now.

2016 Theodore Roosevelt National Park Quarter launch ceremony at Painted Canyon Visitor Center

The new Theodore Roosevelt National Park quarter, fourth issue of 2016 and 34th in the series, was celebrated during the launch ceremony on August 25th and released for general circulation on the 29th. The special event coincides with the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which has watched over our parks since August 25, 1916.
Painted Canyon Visitor Center is located near the town of Medora, North Dakota. It is part of the park’s South Unit (the park has 3 units: the South Unit, the North Unit and Elkhorn Ranch).
Children received new quarters, featuring Teddy Roosevelt on horseback near the Little Missouri River in the park. The 2016 series quarters honor some of America’s more scenic parks – Shawnee, Cumberland Gap, Harpers Ferry, Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter) and, now with this release, Theodore Roosevelt. Update your collection today with new Theodore Roosevelt National Park Quarters.

Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) Quarter design finalized

Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter design

Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter design

On July 22, 2015, the U.S. Mint announced the final design for the Fort Moultrie, also known as Fort Sumter National Monument, quarters. The reverse shows a sergeant returning the regimental flag to the ramparts, as a British ship attacks in the distance.

The inscriptions on the coin’s reverse include the name of the site, fort moultrie; the location of the site, south carolina; the year of issue, 2016; and the motto, e pluribus unum.

This handsome quarter is a perfect match for the 2000 Statehood quarter, which also featured South Carolina, the park’s home state. As the 35th in the series overall, the Fort Moultrie quarter is the final issue for this year.

Candidate designs for new 2016 Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter

Fort Moultrie National Park quarter candidate designs

Candidate designs for the Fort Moultrie National Park quarter

In late 2014, both the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee and the Commission of Fine Arts reviewed several candidate designs for the reverse of the 2016 Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) quarter.

CCAC discussed the potential of several designs before finally giving their recommendation to a design showing a sergeant returning the regimental flag to the ramparts, as a British ship attacks in the distance. The CFA gave its support to a closer view of a sergeant holding the flag, with cannon fire exploding behind him.

Located in South Carolina, Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) stands as a historic reminder of our nation’s past.

Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) featured 35th in National Park Quarter series

Fort Sumter National Monument

Fort Sumter National Monument

Fort Moultrie wasn’t yet complete in 1776, when British warships opened fire on Sullivan’s Island during the Revolutionary War. Even still, patriots stationed there were able to fend off the attack, and the fort was named for its commanding colonel, William Moultrie. Following the war’s end, the original fort fell in to disrepair. When war erupted between England and France in 1793, a second Fort Moultrie was built – which was eventually destroyed during an 1804 hurricane.

By the start of the Civil War, an improved fort (Sumter) had been built – and it was there that the war’s first battle was fought. Today, both forts are open to tourists. Moultrie has been restored to represent its historical time periods, while Sumter houses a museum.

Learn more about Fort Sumter National Monument.